in Agile

Agile Ain’t Wishy Washy

As I write this there’s a group of about 15 developers and designers standing near my desk in a heated but constructive argument about how to check the design is right before the code heads off to QA.

Occasionally the dichotomy of agile vs. waterfall is raised, and sometimes “agile” is used as a euphemism for “flexible” as in, “well, there was an update in design document X, and we’re agile, so you should be able to integrate that.”

If there’s one thing I’ve learned from doing agile it’s that agile ain’t wishy washy, i.e. it’s not really some sort of flexibility nirvana. Any software development process relies on firm lines drawn around what, when, and how the work gets done. Otherwise, shit don’t get done.

Yes, agile is better at responding to change. But it is effective, somewhat counterintuitively, because it responds to change with a high degree of rigidity. For example, if the stories aren’t written in a way that makes it clear to developers how to code a feature and how to test it, it doesn’t get accepted into a sprint. Once stories are accepted into a sprint nothing else can start until the next sprint. And so on. When I first encountered all this rigidity I thought the developers were acting like self-involved prima donnas. Actually, they’re just enforcing the rules that make the process work.

Agile responds to change, not wishy washiness.